The Whitechapel murders/Jack the Ripper
Eleven murders of women, committed in or near the impoverished Whitechapel District in the East End of London between 3 April 1888 and 13 February 1891. All the murders remain unsolved. At various points some or all of the killings have been ascribed to the notorious, unidentified serial killer known as Jack the Ripper.

Most, if not all, of the victims—Emma Elizabeth Smith, Martha Tabram, Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes, Mary Jane Kelly, Rose Mylett, Alice McKenzie, Frances Coles, and an unidentified woman—were prostitutes. Smith was sexually assaulted and robbed by a gang. Tabram was stabbed 39 times. Nichols, Chapman, Stride, Eddowes, Kelly, McKenzie and Coles had their throats cut. Eddowes and Stride were killed on the same night, minutes and less than a mile apart; their murders were nicknamed the “double event”, after a phrase in a postcard sent to the press by someone claiming to be the Ripper. The bodies of Nichols, Chapman, Eddowes and Kelly suffered abdominal mutilations. Mylett was strangled. The body of the unidentified woman was dismembered, but the exact cause of her death is unclear.

The Metropolitan Police Force, City of London Police, and private organisations such as the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee were involved in the search for the killer or killers. Despite extensive inquiries and several arrests, the culprit or culprits evaded identification and capture. The murders drew attention to the poor living conditions in the East End slums, which were subsequently improved. The enduring mystery of who committed the crimes has captured the public imagination to the present day.

The Whitechapel murders/Jack the Ripper

Eleven murders of women, committed in or near the impoverished Whitechapel District in the East End of London between 3 April 1888 and 13 February 1891. All the murders remain unsolved. At various points some or all of the killings have been ascribed to the notorious, unidentified serial killer known as Jack the Ripper.

Most, if not all, of the victims—Emma Elizabeth Smith, Martha Tabram, Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes, Mary Jane Kelly, Rose Mylett, Alice McKenzie, Frances Coles, and an unidentified woman—were prostitutes. Smith was sexually assaulted and robbed by a gang. Tabram was stabbed 39 times. Nichols, Chapman, Stride, Eddowes, Kelly, McKenzie and Coles had their throats cut. Eddowes and Stride were killed on the same night, minutes and less than a mile apart; their murders were nicknamed the “double event”, after a phrase in a postcard sent to the press by someone claiming to be the Ripper. The bodies of Nichols, Chapman, Eddowes and Kelly suffered abdominal mutilations. Mylett was strangled. The body of the unidentified woman was dismembered, but the exact cause of her death is unclear.

The Metropolitan Police Force, City of London Police, and private organisations such as the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee were involved in the search for the killer or killers. Despite extensive inquiries and several arrests, the culprit or culprits evaded identification and capture. The murders drew attention to the poor living conditions in the East End slums, which were subsequently improved. The enduring mystery of who committed the crimes has captured the public imagination to the present day.

(via hot4bjergsen)


(Source: dissolving-into-molecules)


Rumored to be a John Wayne Gacy victim

Rumored to be a John Wayne Gacy victim

(Source: blaze-it-bitch)


Unrelated but i thought this was cute.

Unrelated but i thought this was cute.

(via dahmundyrez)


“I was literally singing to myself on my way home, after the killing.  The tension, the desire to kill a woman had built up in such explosive  proportions that when I finally pulled the trigger, all the pressures,  all the tensions, all the hatred, had just vanished, dissipated, but  only for a short time.” — David Berkowitz

“I was literally singing to myself on my way home, after the killing. The tension, the desire to kill a woman had built up in such explosive proportions that when I finally pulled the trigger, all the pressures, all the tensions, all the hatred, had just vanished, dissipated, but only for a short time.” — David Berkowitz

(Source: doctorpretorius)


“I don’t like killing; I don’t kill bushes, I don’t kill trees, I don’t  eat animals, I don’t like killing. But, I am like anybody else— I can  kill when I am pushed to do that. Just as easy as you eat a steak, or  fry a chicken.”
— Charles Manson, 1987

“I don’t like killing; I don’t kill bushes, I don’t kill trees, I don’t eat animals, I don’t like killing. But, I am like anybody else— I can kill when I am pushed to do that. Just as easy as you eat a steak, or fry a chicken.”

— Charles Manson, 1987

(Source: therealmansons)


youlooksick-deactivated20110722: Have you posted anything about Jack the Ripper? So far, I haven't found anything but maybe I'm not looking hard enough, lol. I actually love reading about him.

I have! look in my index, and there should be some stuff in there. i haven’t posted much on him, but i will soon. 


Anonymous: how many followers do you have, and when did you make this blog ? :D

164 followers, and i made this blog -look in archive- on the 7th of this month. ~ February ~


I have the slowest internet at the moment, so i can hardly post. Only when i’m at school can i actually make the time to update. Also i have asked my close friend Holly to help me run this blog. hopefully she can! remember to send in comments, questions and suggestions to my ask box. this is also my 100th post so have a gif of Ted Bundy~

 


Anonymous: Harold Shipman, some killers from the 15-1800s, Henry Lee Lucas, Charles Cullen, Boston Strangler. just a few ideas for you!

thank you, i haven’t heard about a few of them so this should be interesting!